Rich, Woody

Primary Position: Starting pitcher
Birthplace: Morganton

First, Middle Names: Woodrow Earl
Date of Birth: March 9, 1916    Date and Place of Death: April 18, 1983, Valdese, NC
Burial: South Mountain Baptist Church Cemetery, Morganton

High School: Morganton High School
College: Did Not Attend

Bats: L             Throws: R        Height and Weight: 6-2, 185
Debut Year: 1939       Final Year: 1944          Years Played: 4
Teams and Years: Boston Red Sox, 1939-41; Boston Braves, 1944

Career Summary
G         W        L          Sv        ERA     IP         SO       WAR
33      6          6          0         5.06     117.1   42        0.5

Woody Rich had all the makings of a great Depression-era newspaper hero. He was a shy farm boy from the hills of North Carolina – the kind of kid sportswriters ended up calling “Rube.” He had come out of nowhere with lightning in his right arm. Before he had even thrown a ball in a regulation, big-league game, the sports scribes primed the pump by comparing him to the legendary pitchers of yore. The lanky string bean, it seems, was being groomed to take his place among the pantheon of star athletes who had been born and had lived on the sports pages – Babe Ruth, Jack Dempsey, Seabiscuit. Times were tough, and readers thirsted for heroes.

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Bradshaw, George

Primary Position: Catcher
Birthplace: Salisbury

First, Middle Nams: George Thomas   

Date of Birth:  Sept. 12, 1924             Date and Place of Death: Nov. 4, 1994, Hendersonville
Burial: Western Carolina Veteran’s Cemetery, Black Mountain, NC

High School: China Grove High School, China Grove, NC

Bats: R             Throws: R        Height and Weight: 6-2, 185
Debut Year: 1952       Final Year: 1952          Years Played: 1
Team and Year: Washington Senators, 1952

Career Summary
G         AB       H         R          RBI      HR       BA.      OBP.    SLG.     WAR
10        23        5          3          6          0          .217     .280     304      -0.2

George Bradshaw was considered a solid, minor-league catcher when he finally got the call in 1952. He had spent almost six years in the low minors. At his last two stops – in Statesville and Morganton in North Carolina – he had smashed more than 30 homer runs and had hit close to .330.

That attracted the attention of the Washington Senators. When his time came, though, Bradshaw lasted about a month in Washington. He appeared in 10 games and hit just over .200. He finished his baseball career as, once again, a solid minor-league catcher.

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